Dr. Paul Rubin, who shared that the Carlson Bridge technology isn’t the only way to go for non-traditional bridgework. You can have a piece milled either by a lab or in the office via CEREC...

Update We received a comment from a friend and dentist

postato da lilyeven12 il 10/05/2018
Categoria: Salute e Benessere - tags: scian nebulizer

Dr. Paul Rubin, who shared that the Carlson Bridge technology isn’t the only way to go for non-traditional bridgework. You can have a piece milled either by a lab or in the office via CEREC technology and have that piece cemented into place. Thank you, Dr. Rubin for adding this piece to the puzzle! Option 5: Removable Bridge The last option we see to span the gap of a missing tooth is with some form of a removable bridge dental handpiece. There are several styles of removable bridges, and they have many names. A few of these ‘out of style’ options are removable partials, a flipper, and Nesbit. As their names suggest, each of these options can be removed from the gap. So, it’s easy to clean around them. Each of these solutions would also help to maintain the space to avoid any changes in bite and teeth shifting. As they do sit directly on the gum tissue of the missing tooth, they may also put some demand on the jaw bone, thus working with our ‘use it or lose it’ principle. There are some possible downsides to removable options. First, they may not fit well and can be uncomfortable. They would require that you be conscious when eating (which isn’t such a bad habit) as they are not cemented into place and could come loose while chewing. You would also have to be diligent about removing it after eating to clean around the space. (Don’t forget to be mindful as to where you put the removable bridge when you do clean the space!) Perhaps the biggest challenge with removable options is finding a dentist who is comfortable helping you fit one. Removable solutions are very much ‘out of fashion’ in our high tech, implant frenzy dentistry culture of today. Finally, don’t forget the material that a removable bridge is made from. We haven’t researched this in its entirety, but it appears that dental acrylic is commonly used, which isn’t the most benign of materials. All this said, if faced with a missing molar, we would look closely into what removable solution would best suit the specifics of our need to fill that gap. Update: One reader made us aware that removable partials should be made from clear acrylic. Partials that are colored contain potentially harmful components. Thank you, Kathy water picker!) A Possible Option 6? Although we’re generally not fans of hoping that technology will rescue us from any given current mess we humans have created (it shrugs our responsibility to live more responsibility), there is some hope that we will be able to grow new teeth from stem cell research. As we hear more about this possible option, you’ll be the first to learn about our findings! We hope that this analysis of the various options we have found available to fill the space of a missing tooth will help you along your path to greater oral health and whole being wellness. scian nebulizer