As you can guess, this demineralization process of the jaw bones doesn’t occur overnight. The bone becomes demineralized first but the overall structure of the bone remains intact. Again according...

The path to getting ‘long in the tooth’

postato da lilyeven12 il 08/05/2018
Categoria: Cellulari e Telefonia - tags: micro motor

As you can guess, this demineralization process of the jaw bones doesn’t occur overnight. The bone becomes demineralized first but the overall structure of the bone remains intact. Again according to Dr. Danenberg, so long as the ‘scaffold’ of the jaw bone remains in place, the bone can remineralize (assuming the cause has been effectively addressed). However, once the scaffold-like structure of the bone also demineralizes, the gum tissue no longer has the supportive structure to remain high on the teeth. Interestingly, this bone loss does not immediately cause the gum to recede. However, at this point, the gum tissue is very vulnerable to recession. Without the underlying support of the bone to keep it in place, any aggravation can provoke the gum tissue to recede. It is at this point when the underlying bone has diminished that brushing unconsciously can most definitely cause gum recession to occur. So, how do we stop gum recession? To stop our gums from receding, we must first identify what’s causing the underlying bone to demineralize. (Again, we are going to temporarily set aside general nutritional deficiency which is a very common contributing factor to this puzzle dental handpiece. We will address this in a separate article soon.) Gum disease: Given that gum disease is so incredibly common in our modern times, it’s worthwhile to assume one has an active infection unless you are really, really sure. Recent research published in the Journal of Dental Research states that 47% of 30-year-olds and over 70% of 65-year-olds have periodontal disease.(1) Mind you, periodontal disease is gum disease that has advanced to the point where the jaw bone is being compromised. You see, in the mouth, the ‘bad bugs’ implicated with gum disease not only directly destroy bone tissue, but they also cause our immune system to go on ‘full alert’ micro motor. In an attempt to stop the infection, one of the defense mechanisms our immune system uses is to create inflammation in the localized region. The problem is when this infection is chronic, this leads to chronic inflammation in the area which also contributes to a breakdown in jaw bone health. We created a free resource, the OraWellness Mouth Map, to help you determine if gum disease is actively undermining your health. Incidentally, while we can’t claim that our HealThy Mouth Blend cures gum disease, we have so many testimonials from thrilled, happy customers all over the world who no longer have bleeding gums or the chronic bad breath associated with gum disease. They attribute their improved oral health to using our HealThy Mouth Blend and Bass toothbrushes and applying the strategies we teach here at OraWellness.com. Bruxism (grinding and clenching) Also, recent research on the cause of grinding one’s teeth is bringing to light that our culture’s understanding of why some people grind their teeth may be incorrect. While the stresses of modern lifestyle may still play a role, researchers are finding that night grinding is very strongly associated with mild sleep apnea. In fact, we interviewed one expert, Dr. Mark Burhenne, a dentist who specializes in patient sleep issues, to detail out the relationship between bruxism, undiagnosed sleep apnea, and chronic fatigue. If you grind your teeth, you owe it to yourself to listen to this fascinating ‘mystery’ connection that’s just beginning to make its way into medicine and dentistry.  How Can I Be Assured My Medical History? for more information.