Too much glucose, also called sugar, in your blood from diabetes can cause pain, infection, and other problems in your mouth implant machine. Your mouth includes your teeth your gums your jaw...

How can diabetes affect my mouth

postato da lilyeven12 il 24/10/2017
Categoria: Internet - tags: contra angle handpiece

Too much glucose, also called sugar, in your blood from diabetes can cause pain, infection, and other problems in your mouth implant machine. Your mouth includes your teeth your gums your jaw tissues such as your tongue, the roof and bottom of your mouth, and the inside of your cheeks Drawing of a woman’s facial profile with the jaw labeled. Inset shows teeth, gums, roof of the mouth, bottom of the mouth, tongue, and inside of cheek. Glucose is present in your saliva—the fluid in your mouth that makes it wet. When diabetes is not controlled, high glucose levels in your saliva help harmful bacteria grow. These bacteria combine with food to form a soft, sticky film called plaque. Plaque also comes from eating foods that contain sugars or starches. Some types of plaque cause tooth decay or cavities. Other types of plaque cause gum disease and bad breath. Image stating that high glucose levels equal an increase in plaque. Gum disease can be more severe and take longer to heal if you have diabetes dental implant machine. In turn, having gum disease can make your blood glucose hard to control. What happens if I have plaque? Plaque that is not removed hardens over time into tartar and collects above your gum line. Tartar makes it more difficult to brush and clean between your teeth. Your gums become red and swollen, and bleed easily—signs of unhealthy or inflamed gums, called gingivitis. When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to gum disease called periodontitis. In periodontitis, the gums pull away from the teeth and form spaces, called pockets, which slowly become infected. This infection can last a long time. Your body fights the bacteria as the plaque spreads and grows below the gum line. Both the bacteria and your body’s response to this infection start to break down the bone and the tissue that hold the teeth in place. If periodontitis is not treated, the gums, bones, and tissue that support the teeth are destroyed contra angle handpiece. Teeth may become loose and might need to be removed. If you have periodontitis, your dentist may send you to a periodontist, an expert in treating gum disease. Drawing of a close-up view of teeth and healthy gums, and a drawing of a close-up view of teeth and gums with periodontitis. Healthy gums Periodontitis